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10 Books You Must Read To Your Military Baby

Little ones love to be told stories, and what way is better than a good book? Make reading part of their every day, at least for a few minutes a day. It will help with their literacy, and also, with the understanding of the world around them. We all know that kids can be very persistent, and experts say children should be given books that refer to events in their lives in order to help them understand and work through the issues. Military kids have a bit more to deal with – often moving, deployments, making new friends and above all the risk of having a parent service in the military. Among many great books, we chose the 10 we consider best for military children to be familiar with.

“H is for Honor: A Military Family Alphabet” by Devin Scillian

This book talks about courage, honor, and commitment in a way every child can easily understand. In this interesting read, your kid will be exposed to multiple lessons, from why it is important to keep writing letters to soldiers to the explanation of the meanings hidden behind an Army/Navy football game.

“Boo Boo Bears Mission: The True Story of a Teddy Bears Adventure in Iraq” by Mary Linda Sather

A plush toy has a very important mission. A little girls’ dad has been deployed to Iraq, and in order to help him, the girl sends him the Boo Boo Bear. Now, the teddy goes into adventures with dad, fulfilling the most important mission of all – carrying a family’s love until they are reunited.

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 “My Dads a Hero” by Rebecca Christiansen

Military kids sometimes feel abandoned, so this book helps them feel pride in their parents’ work. It shows them a small portion of daily sacrifices military members have to make. The most beautiful idea in this book, are the places for photographs of children with their parent that fit into the story. How cool is that?

“Hero Dad” by Melinda Hardin

Some superheroes drive super-powered cars, other have X-ray vision, can fly, or shape shift. And others? Well, others drive tanks, wear uniforms and army boots, and go on trips far away from home, to help make the world a safer place. It looks like a tough job, and it actually is, and superheroes always do what’s right. Melinda Hardin wrote a simple text full of understanding, and Bryan Langdon illustrated the book with watercolors and pencil. ‘’Hero Dad’’ is here to make a difficult and sensitive subject simpler for children with parents who serve far from their homes.

“Hero Mom” by Melinda Hardin

Every mom is a superhero, and military ones may be even more so than others! They cannot leap over buildings or stop a moving train, but they fly plains, heal soldiers, construct buildings and make tanks go. They help create a safer world in all kinds of ways. Superhero moms are military moms.

“My Mommy Wears Combat Boots” by Sharon McBride

This book is great for moms in uniforms everywhere. It helps mothers explain to their little ones all the emotions connected to their deployment, and offers a positive way to channel those feelings when mommy is away. Books like this one are few in number, so this one is to be cherished among mothers in the service.

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“Love Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom” by Lisa Tucker McElroy

A lovely, warm tale about a little girl named Lizzie who is trying to find a way to handle her mom’s deployment by writing letters. It is a sincere and loving book everyone can relate to. We loved it, and so will your kid.

“The ABCs of the Army” by Maria Cordova

Fun illustrations explain words that are already part of military kid’s lives, so it’s a great way to teach younger kids the alphabet. Also, it is good for older kids to see things from their everyday life explained and illustrated in a book.

“Night Catch” by Brenda Ehrmantraut

This is a book with beautiful illustrations and a heartwarming story about a dad who is a deployed soldier. He plays a nightly game of catch with his son, but he uses the North Star as a ball.

What do you think about our list? Have you read any of these books to your kids? Do you have some recommendations of your own? We’d love to hear what you think and if you have any more suggestions!

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